computing

Tedium

The Tale of the Free-Net, the Cheap Way Dial-Up Users Got Online

In the 80s, a defining online phenomenon—being able to use the internet for free—came from (of all places) Cleveland. Here’s the story of the Free-Net.
Ernie Smith
1.20.18
What Is the iPhone?

Apple’s Third Co-Founder Has Never Used an iPhone and Has No Regrets

83-year-old Ronald G. Wayne designed Apple’s first logo and cashed out his 10 percent share for just $800. But he would do it again in a heartbeat.
Madeline Moitozo
7.11.17
structural variants

Researchers Made an Electrical Circuit Etch-A-Sketch in Crystals

The breakthrough paves the way for an “etch-a-sketch of nanoscale electrical connections.”
Daniel Oberhaus
6.14.17
space computers

How the Humble CPU Launched NASA’s Golden Age of Space Exploration

Even today, retro-computing is carrying humanity to the edge of interstellar space.
John Wenz
5.28.17
It's Hacks All the Way Down

Your Government's Hacking Tools Are Not Safe

From Cellebrite, to Shadow Brokers, to the CIA dump, so many recent data breaches have shown there is a real risk of exposure of government hacking tools.
Joseph Cox
4.14.17
Tedium

The Great Failure of Wang Laboratories, the David to IBM’s Goliath

The minicomputer maker Wang Laboratories ran an ad during the Super Bowl long before Apple did. So why did the company and its minicomputers become a footnote?
Ernie Smith
2.21.17
qubits

Here’s How to Build the First Large-Scale Quantum Computer

The only thing that remains is to actually build it.
Daniel Oberhaus
2.2.17
Apple

Steve Wozniak Was My Computer Teacher in 1995

The Apple co-founder spent his own money, and more importantly, lots of his own time, showing us public school kids how to use the early internet.
Madeline Moitozo
12.7.16
TOYS

The Astonishing Failure of the Toy Company That Made Teddy Ruxpin

Staffed by former Atari employees and with a big hit on its hands, Worlds of Wonder tried to ride Teddy Ruxpin to the promised land. They failed, fast.
Ernie Smith
9.13.16
security

Researchers Made the First Quantum Enigma Machine

A quantum enigma machine is theoretical device that is able to use photons to encrypt messages using keys that are shorter than the message itself—and now it’s real.
Daniel Oberhaus
8.8.16
Cancer

Scientists Built a Biological Computer Inside a Cell

Chemically hacking bacterial DNA allows for a whole new world of biological computation.
Michael Byrne
7.21.16
short circuit

The End of Moore's Law Might Not Be A Bad Thing

It’s possible your children will grow up with computers that are not much faster than you use today. But it might not matter, because we may well have reached the point where our computing is “good enough.”
Alasdair Allan
7.12.16