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'PC Building Simulator' Takes the Intimidation Out of Your First Build

Not that we would need such a thing, of course.

Building a computer can be a daunting task for first timer. Hell, even if you've done it before, there are aspects that can be trying and test your patience. (Ahem.) Manuals aren't always well-written, and it's a little too easy to screw things up. It would be nice to have a dry run.

Starting up PC Building Simulator. Image: Nicholas Deleon/Motherboard

Claudiu, a programmer from Romania, is looking to change that with his new multiplatform PC Building Simulator "game." While currently in a pre-alpha state, it gives a very nice three dimensional representation of what it's like to assemble a desktop computer from off the shelf components.

"The development of the game started as a personal project, that I thought later people would enjoy," Claudiu told Motherboard in an email. "I always had a thing for building computers and toying with different configurations and components, but it's a very expensive hobby. When you I couldn't find any software allowing me to do this, I thought I would make my own."

The game guides you through the installation process. Image: Nicholas Deleon/Motherboard

He has clearly made a lot of progress in the six months since he first posted a demo video on YouTube; the first demo does exactly what you want it to do, even being a very early build. "You can see in the first videos I posted that it started out very simplistic and I just kept building on it until I thought I would be ready to release a demo," he noted.

Right after installing the CPU. Image: Nicholas Deleon/Motherboard

Overall, the response has been positive so far, with members of communities like NeoGAF finding the simulator especially useful. "I am very glad that people enjoy it so much and I have received a lot of support from them which is wonderful," said Claudiu. While some of the NeoGAF posters have suggested he try to license it to enthusiast websites or parts resellers, Claudiu's aims are more down to earth. "My eventual goal is for it to be a full game, which I would be able to publish and sell," he said. "I want it to be as realistic as possible so it can be not only a game, but also a tool for people to use to plan builds, learn how to build computers, see how parts look together, everything like that."