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Teenage Hackers Say They've Doxed More Than 2,000 Government Employees

The group allegedly accessed a database containing the personal info of thousands of government workers.

Image: Pierre (Rennes)/Flickr

Teenage hackers who claim to have broken into the AOL email account of the CIA director are at it again, and this time they might have actually broken into government computers.

On Thursday, a member of the teenage hacktivist group known as Crackas With Attitude (CWA) published an alleged list of more than 2,000 names, phone numbers and email addresses of law enforcement and military personnel. The member, who goes by the name Cracka, claimed to have leaked the data in support of Palestine.

"Maybe the USgov should listen to us, I mean, we have enough information to make them look like the little bitches they are," Cracka said in a tweet.

Earlier on Thursday, Cracka told Motherboard that the group hacked into someone's account, and got access to several "tools feds use" such as JABS, a database of arrested people, IC3, an FBI crime-reporting tool, and VCC, a sharing tool for law enforcement agencies. He declined to say whose account they hijacked, only that the owner is someone "high in the [government]."

"We have enough information to make them look like the little bitches they are."

Cracka, however, claimed it could've been worse.

"We let the [government] off by a lot, this could be so damaging it could affect the whole of USA by ALOT," he said in an online chat, adding that they didn't download all the data they had access to.

In a previous tweet, Cracka claimed to have "34,000 lines of emails, names, position and phone numbers of gov associates, including military," suggesting the hackers might have more data to release. "Just to clear this up, CWA did, indeed, have access to everybody in USA's private information, now imagine if we was [sic] Russia or China," he said in another tweet.

Some of the phone numbers seems to be legitimate; Motherboard was able to confirm the accuracy of at least five random numbers in the list.

An FBI spokesperson declined to comment.

The hackers, who claimed to have gained access to an email address associated with the FBI Deputy Director earlier this week, also taunted authorities with their usual bravado.

This story has been corrected. A previous version of this article stated the names on the list were more than 3,500, but they're actually around 2,300. Motherboard regrets the error.